Become a Client

Kiddythotics

Functional Orthotics for Children

Kiddythotics

What’s a ProLab Kiddythotic®? It’s the only functionally-corrected prefabricated orthoses developed to treat pediatric flatfoot. We used evidence-based research to design Kiddythotics with functional corrections that were previously available only in custom devices. The rigid polypropylene shell integrates these advanced functional corrections:

  • Medial flange
  • Deep heel cup                                                                                                   
  • 4/4 rearfoot post
  • 4mm medial heel skive1

Click here to take a closer look at our Kiddythotics               
 

P3 Kiddythotics — "the best of any of the prefabricated devices"
                                                                                     Ronald Valmassy, DPM
                                                                            Podiatry Today, August 2009

Pediatric Flatfoot Treatment

Follow the evidence-based clinical care pathway for pediatric flatfoot2 and use P3 Functional Kiddythotics for your smallest patients. Kids love the brightly colored orthotics that  are available in seven color-coded sizes. Each size is represented by a different colored orthotic. Download order form.

Fitting children with orthotics can be challenging. To make this process easier we offer our clients a Kiddythotics sizer set. These sets include a single Kiddythotic in each of the seven sizes for easy sizing while assuring the most accurate fit. Contact Client Services for more information or to request one sizing set.
 

Learn more


References

  1. Kirby KA. The medial heel skive technique. Improving pronation control in foot orthoses. J Am Podiatr Med Assoc. 82(4):177-188, 1992.
  2. Evans AM. The Flat-Footed Child - To Treat or Not to Treat What is the Clinician to Do? J Am Podiatr Med Assoc. 98(5):386-393, 2008.

 

sd sd sd sd sd sd sd

Home   |   About   |   Products   |   Education   |   Consultation   |   Client Services   |   E-Journal    |   Blog